January 24, 2019

    A new antibiotic to treat a deadly drug resistant gut bacteria

    Health | Jan 21, 2019 | Kshitij Jadhav

    Ramizol could help save lives lost to antibiotic resistant gut bacteria
    A new antibiotic to treat a deadly drug resistant gut bacteria - interesting science news

    Clostridium difficile infection is a deadly infection, which is most commonly seen in patients who usually take antibiotics for a long duration. The bad news is that this bacteria is becoming resistant to several antibiotics now.

    How, now scientists are developing a new antibiotic called Ramizol. This antibiotic when tested in hamsters along with a lethal dose of bacteria, a large proportion of hamsters survived proving its effectiveness.

    Ramizol when tested in rats did not result in any serious side-effects like weight loss. Further, Ramizol has low cost of production and this would a wonderful addition in the arsenal against out fight against Clostridium difficile.

    Read the full story: Flinders University (via ScienceDaily)
    Scientific publication: Scientific Reports


    More species under extinction threat

    Earth | Jan 21, 2019 | Kshitij Jadhav

    A new technique to identify endangered species is much more sensitive
    More species under extinction threat - interesting science news

    The Red List of Threatened Species, which is the gold standard for such a classification, wrongly categorizes approximately 600 species as non-threatened. A new comprehensive approach categorizes these and another 100 species, which were not assessed before on the extinction list.

    While previous method employed used a limited amount of data to categorize the species on the Red List, this newly designed method provides additional independent information, which helps in better species assessment.

    This new information is then coupled with statistical modelling to assess other parameters like a species ability to move through a fragmented landscape and then decide whether it could go on the endangered list.

    Read the full story: Radboud University Nijmegen
    Scientific publication: Conservative Biology


    Science News this week: - 19 Jan 2019

    Science Videos | Jan 19, 2019 | Kshitij Jadhav

    Here is a brief overview of all the interesting science stories that happened last week. The latest science and technology news. ScienceBriefss gets you the most interesting science stories and scientific news everyday. ScienceBriefss Youtube.

    Early childhood neglect linked to poor memory

    Mind and Brain | Jan 18, 2019 | Kshitij Jadhav

    Early deprivation in childhood has long lasting effects on the mental health of these children
    Early childhood neglect linked to poor memory - interesting science news

    Children who have not experienced the warmth of a family life and have faced neglect in institutionalized settings have poor memory and executive functions at 8-16 years compared to children who have been placed in quality foster homes early in life.

    Researchers analyzed the data which reported higher mental health problems in institutionalized children in adolescence such as rule-breaking, stealing or assault to come to this conclusion.

    This shows that early deprivation and neglect in childhood has long term and sometimes irreversible impact on the cognitive development of children and our focus should be to avoid these problems.

    Read the full story: ScienceDaily
    Scientific publication: PNAS


    Genes linked to early onset obesity discovered

    Mind and Brain | Jan 18, 2019 | Kshitij Jadhav

    Gene mutations in the developing hypothalmus linked to early onset obesity
    Genes linked to early onset obesity discovered - interesting science news

    It has been known that the brain region hypothalamus plays an important role in regulating food intake. Now, researchers have found out molecules that are associated with this brain circuit.

    Scientists found that the developing hypothalamus neurons communicate with other neurons by releasing semaphorins, which guides these neurons towards each other. Blocking these semaphorins not only disrupted the developing hypothalamus but also caused increased body weight.

    Then the scientists moved towards testing the genes associated with these mechanisms in humans and found out that individuals with an early onset obesity had gene mutations involved in semaphorins. This shows that some people are prewired to develop obesity.

    Read the full story: ScienceDaily
    Scientific publication: Cell


    Why biodiversity is economically important for the production of fruit

    Life | Jan 18, 2019 | Erwin van den Burg

    Biodiversity around apple orchards attracts more bee species for pollination
    Why biodiversity is economically important for the production of food - life short science news

    Orchards surrounded by agricultural land are visited by a few bee species, and this leads to relatively poor pollination and production, a new study shows.

    In contrast, natural habitats in the immediate vicinity harbor a rich diversity of bee species that each help to pollinate.

    Thus, this study shows the importance of biodiversity for productivity in agriculture.

    Read the full story: Cornell University
    Scientific publication: Science


    Discovery of a new mechanism to grow strong bones for future treatment of osteoporosis

    Health | Jan 18, 2019 | Erwin van den Burg

    Blocking signals from a small number of neurons in the brain produces bone growth in female mice. Image: Holly Ingraham/UC San Francisco
    Discovery of a new mechanism to grow strong bones for future treatment of osteoporosis - health short science news

    Scientists have found that blocking just a few neurons in the brain, in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus to be precise, of female mice boosts bone growth enormously. Bone mass can increase to 800% and the bones remain strong until old age.

    Importantly, blocking these brain cells in female mice that were already suffering from osteoporosis restored bone loss, suggesting these cells control bone formation.

    How the brain cells involved do this is not clear as yet, indicating that the scientists have discovered a new mechanism of how bone growth is controlled, and thus holds great promise for new treatment options.

    Read the full story: UCLA
    Scientific publication: Nature Communications


    Breathing problems while asleep linked to heart-related death

    Health | Jan 18, 2019 | Alexandru Ciobanu

    Poor sleep might reduce the oxygen levels in the blood and contribute to death induced by heart problems
    Breathing while asleep linked to heart-related death - short science news

    Some people experience interrupted breathing while asleep, especially the elderly, and this leads to decreased oxygenation of the blood. A new study showed that the poor oxygenation during sleep is correlated with heart-related death in older men.

    The researchers monitored 2840 men aged in their 70s and early 80s. “The study showed that when the men had 12 or more minutes of sleep at low oxygen saturation below 90 percent this increased the risk of heart-related death by 59 percent,” says Associate Professor Baumert, one of the main authors.

    Screening and treatment for risk factors in these people might reduce sleep hypoxia and increase survival rates.

     

     

    Read the full story: University of Adelaide
    Scientific publication: European Heart Journal


    New rapid blood test accurately diagnoses and rules out tuberculosis infection

    Health | Jan 17, 2019 | Erwin van den Burg

    Tuberculosis infections should be diagnosed quickly for the benefit of the patient and prevent the bacteria from spreading to other persons
    New rapid blood test accurately diagnoses and rules out tuberculosis infection - health short science news

    A new blood test has been developed that not only accurately diagnoses tuberculosis, but also rules out tuberculosis.

    This means that patients who are tuberculosis-negative do not have to undergo unnecessary further screening, and that hospitals can refrain from doing additional tests to confirm the presence of the tuberculosis bacteria.

    Thus, this test is better than the rapid blood test currently in use, which can detect, but cannot rule out tuberculosis, and will save health systems a lot of money.

    Read the full story: Imperial College London
    Scientific publication: The Lancet – Infectious Diseases


    Do you crave some delicious food? Smelling it should be enough

    Mind and Brain | Jan 17, 2019 | Kshitij Jadhav

    A new study indicates that one sense can compensate another.
    Do you crave some delicious food? Smelling it should be enough - interesting science news

    We all know that feeling when just a whiff of French fries triggers us in having a high-calorie meal. However, now researchers have found out that just the food scent could directly satisfy this craving.

    Researchers found an inverse correlation between the length of exposure time and whether someone will eat that food item. Those given a choice between cookies and strawberries, chose cookies if they could smell it for less than 30 seconds but if they were exposed to the same smell for two minutes, they ended up choosing the healthier strawberries.

    This study could help us effectively influence people’s food choices rather than the currently used restrictive policies.

    Read the full story: ScienceDaily
    Scientific publication: Journal of Marketing Research


    Bird feathers inspiring next generation adhesives and aerospace materials

    Technology | Jan 17, 2019 | Kshitij Jadhav

    Feathers provide insight for developing next gen aerospace materials
    Bird feathers inspiring next generation adhesives and aerospace materials - interesting science news

    We all have played with bird feathers and watched with amazement how the feather unzips and zips effortlessly and pulls itself back together. In a major scientific discovery, researchers for the first time in two decades looked at the detailed structure of the feather and found that regardless of the species, the barbules (structures that connect feather barbs) are spaced 8-16 micrometre apart.

    This indicates that this spacing is important in flight since it is conserved across different bird species.

    The scientists also built prototype new materials based on this structure which could have aerospace applications and new adhesives like Velcro.

    Read the full story: University of California San Diego
    Scientific publication: Science Advances


    Radically new eating habits needed to improve human health and protect the Earth

    Health | Jan 17, 2019 | Erwin van den Burg

    With this reference diet, based on scientific research, many diseases can be prevented, and the Earth’s ecosystems preserved. Image: EAT-Lancet commission
    Radically new eating habits needed to improve human health and protect the Earth - health short science news

    For three years, 37 experts from 16 countries have been working to establish the first scientific targets for a healthy diet from sustainable food systems. This reference diet is necessary to prevent the 11 million avoidable premature deaths worldwide and to save the Earth.

    Two recommendations that are very obvious from the study is that people in developed countries should cut their red meat consumption by 50% and double their fruit and vegetables intake.

    To drastically change our eating habits, policy makers should work together with those working in agriculture, transport, trade, health, and industry, and consumers should pay more attention to what they eat, scientists say.

    Read the full story: EAT-Lancet Commission
    Scientific publication: The Lancet (Comment)
    Scientific publication: The Lancet (Article)


    Growing nerve cells from skin cells

    Health | Jan 16, 2019 | Kshitij Jadhav

    Neurons developed from skin cells look exactly like brain neurons
    Growing nerve cells from skin cells - interesting science news

    Cells from skin cells of mice which were induced to turn into nerve cells have molecular signatures which match the neurons that develop naturally in the brain. This is interesting science news since this technology can be used to for research in gene therapies from patients own cells.

    The skin cells used in this technology are called the fibroblasts which are the most common cells in the connective tissue in animals and are involved in wound healing.

    Researchers plan to use this technology to understanding the age related cognitive decline in humans.

    Read the full story: Salk Institute
    Scientific publication: eLife


    Parasitic mite of honeybees does not feed on blood, but on the fat body

    Life | Jan 16, 2019 | Erwin van den Burg

    In this electron micrograph, a parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, is wedged between the abdominal plates of a honey bee's exoskeleton. Image: UMD/USDA/PNAS
    Parasitic mite of honeybees does not feed on blood, but on fat - life short science news

    The honeybee parasitic mite Varroa destructor does not feed on blood, as previously thought, but consumes an organ called the fat body.

    This organ not only serves many of the same vital functions carried out by our liver, but also stores food and contributes to the bees’ immune systems. As Varroa eats away the fat body, the bees lose their ability to fight pesticides and stored food.

    Now that it is understood how mites do their damage to bees, effective treatments can be developed.

    Read the full story: University of Maryland
    Scientific publication: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences oft he USA


    Fasting to improve health

    Health | Jan 16, 2019 | Kshitij Jadhav

    Fasting affects the circadian rhythm positively
    Fasting to improve health - interesting science news

    Scientists have discovered that fasting helps in modulating the circadian clocks in the muscle and liver thereby rewiring their metabolism ultimately improving health. It also provides protection against aging related conditions.

    In a study conducted in mice, a 24 hour fasting causes a reduction in oxygen consumption and energy expenditure which gets abolished by eating later. This also primes the genes to anticipate the next food intake and drives the next cycle of gene expression.

    All this affects the cell function positively and this research could help us develop strategies to improve health in humans.

    Read the full story: University of California - Irvine
    Scientific publication: Cell Reports


    Subscribe to our mailing list

    * indicates required